Pretty in Pink

Courtesy of The Football Blogging Awards

Picture courtesy of The Football Blogging Awards.

Last week Scotland unveiled their new away kit for the European Championship campaign. A primrose, yellow and white tribute to the classical racing colours of Lord Rosebery, a strip that on its debut must surely have been a contributing factor in Scotland defeating England 6-1 at The Kennington Oval, current home of Surrey County Cricket Club. The new strip unsurprisingly has divided opinion but pink in all its shades has become a way for clubs and individuals to leave their own special stamp on the world of footballing fashion. In celebration of this latest inductee to the football kit hall of fame, or shame dependent on your viewpoint, let’s take a look at some of the more notable examples of players looking pretty in pink.

Palermo

Palermo, unlike the rest of the teams that will be mentioned in this piece, sport pink not as an alternative but as their primary kit colour. Based in Sicily, historical home of the Mafia it seems almost fitting that the island’s number one club would sport a kit so flamboyant that it almost encourage those that visit to, ‘Come and have a go if you think you’re hard enough’. Initially playing in red and blue when formed in 1898 the strip was changed to the now familiar pink and black nine years later at the suggestion of Count Airoldi to represent the ‘sadness and sweetness’  of the sides consistence inconsistencies only for Benito Mussolini, Hitler’s some time BFF in facism, to order it be replaced with a more regimented red and yellow of the area’s municipality during the Second World War. After a brief flirtation with light blue in the post-war era the Rosanero (when translated from Italian means ‘The Pink-blacks’)returned to Airoldi’s recommendation soon after and they continue to sport the colours of pink and block to this very day.

Partick Thistle

While Palermo’s pride in pink is born out of history for other clubs the choice of pink can simply be a case of standing out from the crowd, something that Partick Thistle managed with ease in the 2008/09 season when they became the first Scottish team to sport pink as part of their team colours. Their away strip looking like something out of the creation centre feature on a computer game sported grey and pink hoops and, as is often is the case with ‘novelty’ kits, was a runaway success generating extra revenue and media coverage for the club.

The Maryhill Magyars were not done there though and the following season continued to think pink with a pink camouflage change kit that’s splendour was only matched by how preposterous a concept it was, looking like something that Barbie would have thrown on if she had wanted to swap her dream house and convertible for a panzer tank and a box of hand grenades. In some eyes the west end of Glasgow where Partick are based is viewed as home to the trendiest bars and shops in Scotland’s largest city but to this day the trend of pink hasn’t really caught on.

Scotland…again!

Although Partick Thistle were the first club side to sport the colour pink with pride, the national team have slowly been forming a reputation as having some of the most striking kits in recent times. This was led by a particularly fruitful spell of fashion related madness in the mid 1990’s. Notable inclusions where an orange and purple pin stripe effort and a white kit with a green, blue and purple lightning storm adorned upon every players chest. A few years later a strip appeared that looked as if someone had photocopied readings from a Richter scale taken during a massive earthquake and then when mental colouring it in with red, orange and purple felt tip pens. It was gregarious to the extreme but to this day is still fondly remembered by many members of the Tartan Army.

While those the strips were brilliantly mad, the salmon offering of the 99-2000 qualifying campaign was dreadful, not because it was pink but because the manufacturers insisted on calling it salmon and to make matters worse it was also rather dull. In fact it was so boring in its conventionality that after a near decade of away kit related lunacy many fans, myself included, made as much effort as possible to erase it from their minds.

Everton

For all the flak given to football clubs and the players that play for them, often chastised as money hungry and disassociated with the common fan they do every now and again show they do have a heart. In the 2008/09 season Everton released a limited edition pink shirt to help raise funds for the NSPCC and the clubs own charity ‘Everton in the Community’. The tops were a huge success, so much so that later in the season another limited edition batch were produced raising a total of over £75,000.

Four years later Scottish club Rangers also went pink also raising over £75,000 for the Rangers Charity Foundation where much like the case was at Everton the demand far exceeded the supply. This trend has been continued by other clubs and countries since allowing football to continue to show the softer side that we all secretly know that it has.

Paulo Aurrecochea

In the main goalkeepers are considered the loose cannons of the footballing world prone to eccentricity and never far away from the next calamity. This is even truer in South America where it is the norm for goalkeepers to be the penalty takers and free kick specialists of their teams. I once saw a clip of an Argentine keeper doing battle with a bee hive positioned in the corner of the net so it will be no so surprise to find that a South American has made his way onto this list.

While many of you may have been expecting the name of Mexican legend Jorge Campos to be highlighted in this section, known as he was for the self designed monstrosities that brought him worldwide infamy at USA ’94 further investigation revealed that this man, Paulo Aurrecochea, is the true king of goalkeeping pink. A Uruguayan playing in Paraguay who not only sports pink in a variety of designs from leopard print to cascading stars but also includes such childhood favourites as Krusty the Clown, Tom and Jerry and fittingly enough The Pink Panther on his goalkeeping attire. Never capped internationally and having never scored a goal he instead has assured his place in South American folklore with his penchant for kids cartoons and a splash of pink every now and again and for that I salute him.

Pink strips continue to pop up everywhere from Birmingham to Bordeaux and as can be seen by Scotland’s latest effort are probably here to stay for a good while yet. So let’s all say cheers to the continuing madness of kit manufacturers everywhere and for those of them who continue to think pink.

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How to Celebrate the FIFA Way

How-to-Celebrate-FIFA-Way-football-blog

The last time I went to a game of football and the team I was supporting scored a goal I celebrated, if it was a really big game or a really important goal, I really celebrated, fist pumping, hugging people beside me that I didn’t know and letting out a colourful barrage of joyous expletives that only a Scottish football fan can. Do you know why, because it feel’s brilliant, a release of tension built up over a week of knuckling down and doing some of the things that you necessarily never wanted to do in the first place, all to pay for that ninety minutes on a Saturday, Sunday or whatever day it may be where anything could happen.

Now imagine you are a football player, finely tuned to give everything for those same ninety minutes and you score a goal, what you do next is crucial, how do you celebrate? A knowing nod to the crowd? Do you kneeslide to the corner? Do you gather your teammates together for a ridiculously over choreographed routine involving the lady whose quietly minding her own business at the first aid station, or do you simply stand arms outstretched soaking in the cheers or boos that the crowd are bellowing at you and you alone? Sometimes the classics are the best and wrapped up in the emotion of it all you pull at your sleeve hard and the next thing you know you are whirling your top above your head like you’re about to take off. As things calm down you put your top back on and jog back to the centre circle where you are greeted by a referee standing with his hand in the air waving a yellow card in your face.

Seriously!?!? I know this isn’t a new phenomenon, but an incident in a match between Everton and Southampton agitated me so much that it prompted the words you see before you. With Southampton 1-0 down and 20 minutes left to go substitute Gaston Ramirez took a pop at goal that had no right to go in but Joel Robles in the Everton goal made a hash of it and so with joy Ramirez spun away to celebrate taking his shirt off in the process. That’s not all though. He then gave the shirt to a young Everton fan sitting in the front row. So not only has he pulled his team back into a difficult game but also contributed to making that young fans trip to Goodison one he will likely never forget. His reward for all these positive efforts, a yellow card. It’s just ridiculous.

A quick history lesson, in 1999 Ryan Giggs scored perhaps the greatest FA Cup goal of all time in a semi final against Arsenal that was the culmination of one of the great rivalries of the modern era. A majestic run and finish that continued after the ball had settled in the goal as Giggs, with the hairiest chest seen in the UK since Pete Sampras last changed his shirt at Wimbledon, sprinted around the pitch with his top waving wildly in the air. Did he get booked? Of Course not. So what’s changed?

Well not a lot, a quick glance at the FIFA 2013/14 rulebook and what merits a cautionable offence in relation to the ‘Celebration of a Goal’ can be read as follows:

A player must be cautioned if he removes his shirt or covers his head with his shirt.

Leaving the field of play to celebrate a goal is not a cautionable offence in itself but it is essential that players return to the field of play as soon as possible.

Referees are expected to act in a preventitive manner and to exercise common sense in dealing with the celebration of the goal.

In the case of Gaston Ramirez, was common sense used? I don’t think so, and in the numerous other cases where a player is booked for the removal of their shirt is common sense used as best practice? I’m not sure.

It’s all abount interpretation. My interpretation of the rule would be that unless the removal of the shirt is done so in an inflammatory nature or to display a message inappropiate in its context to its surroundings then a yellow card would not be required. However the mandatory wording of the initial law would mean that if this was in force over the last 20 years Fabrizio Ravinelli would have had as many suspensions as he would have had goals, renowned for pulling his shirt over his head whenever he scored a goal, he would have been left to twiddle his thumbs as part of his celebratory routine.

Arguments that players should not show their bare chest are becoming redundent when so many players wear body hugging under armour to prevent muscle strains and a common sense approach can be used in countries where such a gesture will cause offence. The removal of garments to flash an individual sponsors logo like the infamous Nicklas Bendtner boxer incident may cause the bean counters in Geneva a headache but in actuality cause no real harm. In fact the huge deal that FIFA made of it only highlighted Paddy Power’s cause further and that’s without the ludicrousness of a fine that was greater in amount than many given to clubs across the globe for the overt use of racism, violence and homophobia within their grounds.

I am not saying the rule is wrong, as I have stated in some instances a yellow card should be considered, what I am suggesting is to take away the mandatory nature of the caution and let actual common sense on the part of the referee decide the players fate. If we don’t then moments like the one experienced by that young fan at Goodison will be a thing of the past and in my eyes that can not be for the good of the game.