Pretty in Pink

Courtesy of The Football Blogging Awards

Picture courtesy of The Football Blogging Awards.

Last week Scotland unveiled their new away kit for the European Championship campaign. A primrose, yellow and white tribute to the classical racing colours of Lord Rosebery, a strip that on its debut must surely have been a contributing factor in Scotland defeating England 6-1 at The Kennington Oval, current home of Surrey County Cricket Club. The new strip unsurprisingly has divided opinion but pink in all its shades has become a way for clubs and individuals to leave their own special stamp on the world of footballing fashion. In celebration of this latest inductee to the football kit hall of fame, or shame dependent on your viewpoint, let’s take a look at some of the more notable examples of players looking pretty in pink.

Palermo

Palermo, unlike the rest of the teams that will be mentioned in this piece, sport pink not as an alternative but as their primary kit colour. Based in Sicily, historical home of the Mafia it seems almost fitting that the island’s number one club would sport a kit so flamboyant that it almost encourage those that visit to, ‘Come and have a go if you think you’re hard enough’. Initially playing in red and blue when formed in 1898 the strip was changed to the now familiar pink and black nine years later at the suggestion of Count Airoldi to represent the ‘sadness and sweetness’  of the sides consistence inconsistencies only for Benito Mussolini, Hitler’s some time BFF in facism, to order it be replaced with a more regimented red and yellow of the area’s municipality during the Second World War. After a brief flirtation with light blue in the post-war era the Rosanero (when translated from Italian means ‘The Pink-blacks’)returned to Airoldi’s recommendation soon after and they continue to sport the colours of pink and block to this very day.

Partick Thistle

While Palermo’s pride in pink is born out of history for other clubs the choice of pink can simply be a case of standing out from the crowd, something that Partick Thistle managed with ease in the 2008/09 season when they became the first Scottish team to sport pink as part of their team colours. Their away strip looking like something out of the creation centre feature on a computer game sported grey and pink hoops and, as is often is the case with ‘novelty’ kits, was a runaway success generating extra revenue and media coverage for the club.

The Maryhill Magyars were not done there though and the following season continued to think pink with a pink camouflage change kit that’s splendour was only matched by how preposterous a concept it was, looking like something that Barbie would have thrown on if she had wanted to swap her dream house and convertible for a panzer tank and a box of hand grenades. In some eyes the west end of Glasgow where Partick are based is viewed as home to the trendiest bars and shops in Scotland’s largest city but to this day the trend of pink hasn’t really caught on.

Scotland…again!

Although Partick Thistle were the first club side to sport the colour pink with pride, the national team have slowly been forming a reputation as having some of the most striking kits in recent times. This was led by a particularly fruitful spell of fashion related madness in the mid 1990’s. Notable inclusions where an orange and purple pin stripe effort and a white kit with a green, blue and purple lightning storm adorned upon every players chest. A few years later a strip appeared that looked as if someone had photocopied readings from a Richter scale taken during a massive earthquake and then when mental colouring it in with red, orange and purple felt tip pens. It was gregarious to the extreme but to this day is still fondly remembered by many members of the Tartan Army.

While those the strips were brilliantly mad, the salmon offering of the 99-2000 qualifying campaign was dreadful, not because it was pink but because the manufacturers insisted on calling it salmon and to make matters worse it was also rather dull. In fact it was so boring in its conventionality that after a near decade of away kit related lunacy many fans, myself included, made as much effort as possible to erase it from their minds.

Everton

For all the flak given to football clubs and the players that play for them, often chastised as money hungry and disassociated with the common fan they do every now and again show they do have a heart. In the 2008/09 season Everton released a limited edition pink shirt to help raise funds for the NSPCC and the clubs own charity ‘Everton in the Community’. The tops were a huge success, so much so that later in the season another limited edition batch were produced raising a total of over £75,000.

Four years later Scottish club Rangers also went pink also raising over £75,000 for the Rangers Charity Foundation where much like the case was at Everton the demand far exceeded the supply. This trend has been continued by other clubs and countries since allowing football to continue to show the softer side that we all secretly know that it has.

Paulo Aurrecochea

In the main goalkeepers are considered the loose cannons of the footballing world prone to eccentricity and never far away from the next calamity. This is even truer in South America where it is the norm for goalkeepers to be the penalty takers and free kick specialists of their teams. I once saw a clip of an Argentine keeper doing battle with a bee hive positioned in the corner of the net so it will be no so surprise to find that a South American has made his way onto this list.

While many of you may have been expecting the name of Mexican legend Jorge Campos to be highlighted in this section, known as he was for the self designed monstrosities that brought him worldwide infamy at USA ’94 further investigation revealed that this man, Paulo Aurrecochea, is the true king of goalkeeping pink. A Uruguayan playing in Paraguay who not only sports pink in a variety of designs from leopard print to cascading stars but also includes such childhood favourites as Krusty the Clown, Tom and Jerry and fittingly enough The Pink Panther on his goalkeeping attire. Never capped internationally and having never scored a goal he instead has assured his place in South American folklore with his penchant for kids cartoons and a splash of pink every now and again and for that I salute him.

Pink strips continue to pop up everywhere from Birmingham to Bordeaux and as can be seen by Scotland’s latest effort are probably here to stay for a good while yet. So let’s all say cheers to the continuing madness of kit manufacturers everywhere and for those of them who continue to think pink.

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About mistermersh
Scottish Sporting Optimist. Pie Connoisseur. Fan of a Good Scran. BJTC Accredited Radio Journalist. All round decent chap. Contributions: Owner of Meat Filled Pastries & Leading The Line Pie and Bovril The Terrace Podcast Nugent4nil The Scotsman The Football Pink The Football Blogging Awards Albion Rovers/Wishaw Juniors Match day Programme. Judge at the 2015 World Scotch Pie Championships.

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